Exploring the Relationship between Privatization in Public Service Delivery and Coproduction: Evidence from U.S. Local Governments

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Exploring the Relationship between Privatization in Public Service Delivery and Coproduction: Evidence from U.S. Local Governments

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2023

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American Review of Public Administration

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Article

Abstract

Since the New Public Management Movement, privatization has become a popular approach for delivering public services. However, few studies empirically assess the relationship between privatization of public service delivery and citizen participation in coproduction. Taking advantage of a national survey of U.S. local government chief administrators, this study aims to contribute to the literature by exploring the link between these two important mechanisms of public service provision. Our findings indicate that local governments are more likely to involve citizens in coproduction when a larger proportion of service delivery is privatized. Regarding various types of coproduction, privatization in public service delivery is positively associated with the likelihood of citizen involvement in co-planning, co-design, and co-assessment, but not in co-delivery. Finally, compared to for-profit service providers, involving nonprofit organizations in public service delivery is likely to create more opportunities for citizens to be involved in the coproduction of public services.

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https://doi.org/10.1177/02750740231155410

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Cheng, Yuan; Jeff, Brudney; Lucas, Meijs. (2023). Exploring the Relationship between Privatization in Public Service Delivery and Coproduction: Evidence from U.S. Local Governments. Retrieved from the University Digital Conservancy, https://doi.org/10.1177/02750740231155410.

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