David Arendale

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At the University of Minnesota, I serve as an Associate Professor in History & Higher Education and Manager of the Educational Opportunity Association (EOA) Best Education Practices Clearinghouse. My home academic department is Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education and Human Development. I teach an undergraduate global history course and conduct workshops for educators to embed best practices of student engagement, enrichment, and academic support. The EOA Clearinghouse identifies, validates, and disseminates best practices to increase persistence and academic achievement of historically underrepresented students.

My scholarly work is expressed through four research projects: (a) academic access, developmental education, and learning assistance; (b) learning technologies; (c) postsecondary peer cooperative learning groups; and (d) Universal Design for Learning. These are not mutually exclusive to each other since effective practices often are found at the crossroads of these four projects. A central theme is improving academic success of historically underrepresented students.

We do not need to "reinvent the wheel" regarding best education practices. Instead, we must effectively communicate what already exists to others. I welcome your thoughts and comments about my work and would enjoy the opportunity to collaborate. Take care, David Arendale (arendale@umn.edu; http://Arendale.org)

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    2023 EOA national best practices clearinghouse library resources directory.
    (Educational Opportunity Association, 2023) Arendale, David R
    The EOA National Best Practices Clearinghouse identifies, validates, and disseminates practical activities and approaches to improve the success of students who are low-income, first-generation, and historically underrepresented in education. Rather than looking to others for solutions, the federally funded TRIO and GEAR-UP grant programs have the expertise needed. The key is sharing it more widely and comprehensively with each other. These are practices that were contributed by TRIO and BU programs across the U.S. that they found helpful. This document is the library resource directory. The co-sponsors for the Clearinghouse are EOA and the University of Minnesota. The Clearinghouse defines best education practices as “the wide range of individual activities, policies, and programmatic approaches to achieve positive changes in student attitudes or academic behaviors.” The practices approved thus far by the EOA Clearinghouse represent each of the five major TRIO grant programs: Educational Talent Search, Upward Bound, Educational Opportunity Centers, Student Support Services, and the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Programs. One practice is from a GEAR UP program. For readers unfamiliar with TRIO programs, a short history is provided on the following pages. While the education practices come from TRIO programs, they could be adapted for use with nearly any student academic support and student development program. TRIO and GEAR UP programs are incubators of best practices to serve the needs of historically underrepresented students and the general student population. Readers can use this publication as a guide for implementing the education practices contained within it. Detailed information about the education practice's purposes, educational theories that guide the practice, curriculum outlines, resources needed for implementation, evaluation process, and contact information are provided by the submitters of the practice who have practical experience implementing the practices. You are encouraged to contact them for additional information.
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    2023 EOA national best practices clearinghouse directory. (7th ed.).
    (Educational Opportunity Association, 2023) Arendale, David R
    The EOA National Best Practices Clearinghouse identifies, validates, and disseminates practical activities and approaches to improve the success of students who are low-income, first-generation, and historically underrepresented in education. Rather than looking to others for solutions, the federally funded TRIO and GEAR-UP grant programs have the expertise needed. The key is sharing it more widely and comprehensively with each other. The co-sponsors for the Clearinghouse are EOA and the University of Minnesota. The Clearinghouse defines best education practices as “the wide range of individual activities, policies, and programmatic approaches to achieve positive changes in student attitudes or academic behaviors.” The administrative and education best practices in this publication have been reviewed and approved by multiple members of an external expert panel of qualified reviewers. Each practice has been approved as promising, validated, or exe plary based on the level of evidence supporting it. The rigorous standards applied during the review process are similar to previous national evaluation efforts by the U.S. Department of Education. More information about the rigorous standards and the external expert panel is contained in the Appendix of this publication. Th practices approved thus far by the EOA Clearinghouse represent each of the five major TRIO grant programs: Educational Talent Search, Upward Bound, Educational Opportunity Centers, Student Support Services, and the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Programs. One practice is from a GEAR UP program. For readers unfamiliar with TRIO programs, a short history is provided on the following pages. While the education practices come from TRIO programs, they could be adapted for use with nearly any student academic support and student development program. TRIO and GEAR UP programs are incubators of best practices to serve the needs of historically underrepresented students and the general student population. Readers can use this publication as a guide for implementing the education practices contained within it. Detailed information about the education practices purposes, educational theories that guide the practice, curriculum outlines, resources needed for implementation, evaluation process, and contact information are provided by the submitters of the practice who have practical experience implementing the practices. You are encouraged to contact them for additional information.
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    2023 Course-Based Learning Assistance: Best Practice Guide for Academic Support Program Design and Improvement
    (International College Learning Centers Association, 2023) Arendale, David R
    The Course-based Learning Assistance (CLA) Best Practice Guide is a generic resource for various peer cooperative learning assistance approaches. It is most applicable to programs that specifically target a course to supplement it and help students to earn higher grades and persist toward graduation. This Guide has a variety of purposes: (a) provide guidance for creating a new program; (b) revise an existing peer study group program; (c) conduct a self-evaluation of an existing program; and (d) serve as a blueprint for short and long-term strategic planning and action plans. It is not expected nor reasonable to expect any peer learning program could implement all the items within this guide. The Guide writing team realizes that programs have limitations of budget, personnel, time, and professional judgment regarding the implementation of this guide. Some readers of this Guide may see the contained policies and practices as “good ideas” to consider for improving their program. In addition to their use for academic study groups, this Guide may be useful for faculty members to incorporate learning activities and pedagogies into their courses. This Guide is published by the Alliance for Postsecondary Academic Support Programs and the National College Learning Centers Association. The Alliance is a writing group of experts in the field of student success that have been producing guides to practice, making conference presentations, facilitating webinars, conducting certification programs, and consulting with institutions since the 1980s. The National College Learning Center Association (NCLCA) represents a diverse body of educators who are dedicated to promoting excellence among learning center personnel. To that end, it is imperative to recognize and celebrate that our members are as diverse as the students we are called to serve
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    Essential Glossary for Increasing Postsecondary Student Success: Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Policymakers
    (College Reading and Learning Association, 2023) Arendale, David R.
    Language is not static. It flows like a river in response to the riverbank and the rocks that border and run beneath it. In the same way, glossaries are dynamic expressions of current language usage. Developmental education and learning assistance have changed dramatically in recent years, and so must also the language used to describe and define them. This glossary is useful for the wide field of educators involved with promoting student success. It provides precise language and definitions to use when communicating with peers and more effectively influencing administrators, legislators, and the media. Some of these glossary terms are emerging with frequent use while others are declining. This is why this glossary is not static and future editions will continue to reflect the changes in language. Based on advice from some of the reviewers to make this glossary more accessible to readers, I reorganized it into different topical categories rather than a traditional alphabetical order. I hope this format will not only make it easier to locate a particular glossary term, but also discover related terms in the same category. The nine glossary categories are: (a) teaching and learning process, (b) antiracism and racism, (c) assessment, (d) copyright and academic integrity, (e) pedagogies for teaching and learning, (f) program management, (g) student-to-student learning, (h) transitional courses and programs, and (i) less acceptable glossary terms. This third edition of the glossary of developmental education and learning assistance terms has dramatically changed since the last edition 14 years ago. For that reason, the name of this glossary has changed and reflects its use in the wider education community. These terms could be useful for educators working in learning assistance, learning centers, developmental-level courses, first-year experience courses and programs, orientation courses and programs, federally-funded TRIO and other equity programs, and instructors teaching first-year and subsequent courses in the general course curriculum. In recognition of the expanded scope of this glossary and broader utility for other members involved with postsecondary education, the glossary title has become more inclusive, Essential Glossary for Increasing Postsecondary Student Success: Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Policymakers.
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    2022 Annotated Bibliography of Postsecondary Peer Cooperative Learning Programs
    (2022-12-31) Arendale, David R.
    This annotated bibliography does not attempt to be inclusive of this broad field of literature concerning peer collaborative learning. Instead, it is focused intentionally on a subset of the educational practice that shares a common focus with increasing student persistence toward graduation. From a review of the professional literature, nine programs emerged: (a) Accelerated Learning Groups (ALGs, USC Model), (b) Emerging Scholars Program (ESP, UC Berkeley; Treisman Model), (c) Embedded Peer Educator (EPE), (d) Learning Assistant (LA, CU Boulder Model), (e) Peer Assisted Learning (PAL, UMN Model), (f) Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL, CUNY Model), (g) Structured Learning Assistance (SLA, FSU Model), (h) Supplemental Instruction-PASS (SI-PASS, UMKC Model), and (i) Video-based Supplemental Instruction (VSI, UMKC Model). As will be described in the following narrative, some of the programs share common history and seek to improve upon previous practices. Other programs were developed independently.
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    History of the EOA Best Practices Clearinghouse: A model to identify, validate, and disseminate education
    (Colleagues of Color for Social Justice, 2022-12-07) Arendale, David; Colvin, Deltha Q.
    The EOA National Best Practices Clearinghouse is focused on the needs of Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) and TRIO students who are economically disadvantaged, first-generation college attendees, and historically underrepresented in education. No other open-access clearinghouse in the nation is focused on this marginalized student population. Solutions developed for privileged students with social capital often do not meet the needs of these students. We represent the GEAR UP and TRIO community and are the first group of federally funded programs to create their own best practices clearinghouse. Rather than relying on practices developed by others, we created an online program manual of what works with our TRIO and GEAR UP students. Our administrative and educational practices have been evaluated by an external panel of education experts rather than relying solely on data studies from the institution hosting the practice. Another difference is that the EOA Clearinghouse identifies “why a practice works” and “what are the critical components and procedures” that must to be followed to achieve similar positive results. This article explores the need for a clearinghouse, definitions for a best education practice, key people involved with the clearinghouse, the history of events in the clearinghouse's life, and finally, lessons learned from the clearinghouse that could be helpful to others who wanted to create their own clearinghouse, and an appendix with information on processes of the clearinghouse to evaluate submissions. While programs in the field may all do essentially the same thing, they often do it differently to meet the unique needs of their students and the education setting. The EOA Clearinghouse honors that ingenuity and shares it with others.
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    Antiracist activities and policies for student-led study groups
    (Journal of College Academic Support Programs, 2022) Arendale, David R.; Abraham, Nisha; Barber, Danette; Bekis, B.; Claybourne, C.; Edenfeld, K.; Epps, K.; Hutchinson, K.; Jimenez, Juan; Killenbeck, K.; Pokhrel, R.; Schmauch, N.; Woodruff, R.
    Issues of race and marginalization do not often intersect with publications related to developmental education and learning assistance. They have been spaces that ignored them these issues. This guide to antiracism policies and practices for student-led study groups is based on a careful review of scholarly articles, books, and existing guides. While much has been written about culturally-sensitive pedagogies for K-16 classroom instruction, little has emerged for guiding peer study groups regarding antiracism practices. This guide helps address this gap in the literature. In addition to its use for academic study groups, this guide is useful for faculty members to incorporate antiracism learning activities and pedagogies into their courses. This guide identifies effective learning practices that can be adapted and adopted for use in supporting higher student achievement, closing the achievement gap, increasing persistence to graduation, and meeting the needs of culturally-diverse and historically-underrepresented students.
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    History of the Integrated Learning Course: Creation, conflict, and survival
    (Colleagues of Color for Social Justice, 2022) Schelske, Bruce; Schelske, Sharyn; Arendale, David
    In 1972, the Integrated Learning (IL) course was developed at the University of Minnesota to meet the academic and cultural transition needs of their TRIO Upward Bound summer bridge program students as they prepared to enter college. The IL course was an early example of a linked course learning community. A historically-challenging college content course such as Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology or Law in Society was linked with an IL course. The IL course is essentially an academic support class customized to use the content of its companion class as a context for mastering learning strategies and orienting students to the rigor of the college learning environment. The history of the IL course provides lessons for creating, sustaining, and surviving daunting campus political and financial challenges that could face any new academic or student affairs program. The TRIO program leveraged its modest budget and personnel for the IL course approach which flourished and withstood changing economic and political forces that could have terminated the innovative approach to academic support. Lessons from this history of creation, conflict, and survival could be applied to other programs in a postsecondary setting.
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    Antiracist study group policies and practices
    (2022) Arendale, David R
    My talk had six sections: (a) the influence of campus culture on student persistence, (b) antiracism resources for peer study group programs, (c) selected definitions related to antiracism, (d) highlights from the guide for Course-based Learning Assistance, (e) sample of antiracism policies and practices, and (f) additional resources for peer study group programs. I shared this talk at one of the monthly professional development seminars for the peer study group leaders at the University of Texas at San Marcos.
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    Lessons Learned and Moving Forward: Antiracist policies and practices for peer learning programs
    (2022) Arendale, David R
    My talk had six sections: (a) the influence of campus culture on student persistence, (b) antiracism resources for peer study group programs, (c) selected definitions related to antiracism, (d) highlights from the guide for Course-based Learning Assistance, (e) sample of antiracism policies and practices, and (f) additional resources for peer study group programs. I shared this talk at a regional conference for Supplemental Instruction hosted by Texas A&M University.
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    Best practices to strengthen academic relationships with college students and a sense of belonging.
    (2022) Arendale, David R
    My talk had six sections: (a) the influence of campus culture on student persistence, (b) antiracism resources for peer study group programs, (c) selected definitions related to antiracism, (d) highlights from the guide for Course-based Learning Assistance, (e) sample of antiracism policies and practices, and (f) additional resources for peer study group programs. I shared this talk at the annual conference for the Heartland Region for College Reading and Learning Association.
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    Moving forward with diversity, equity, and inclusion: Changing the culture of postsecondary education
    (2022) Arendale, David R
    My talk had six sections: (a) definitions of diversity, equity, and inclusion; (b) sample DEI statements; (c) what we know about campus culture; (d) definitions of key antiracism terms; (e) antiracist behaviors and policies for learning assistance; and (f) additional resources for DEI, peer learning programs, and other learning assistance activities. I shared this talk at the annual conference of the New York College Learning Skills Association. NYCLSA is focused on best practices for developmental-level courses, peer study programs, tutoring, and learning centers. This profession has already been making significant changes to implement antiracist practices.
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    Usingl podcasting for education: Anywhere, anytime
    (2022) Arendale, David R.
    These are the topics: (a) podcasting described and why popular, (b) lessons and statistics about podcasting, (c) distributing podcasts widely, (d) how to begin podcasting (develop the podcast idea, recording software and hardware, selecting the podcast host, find a partner for the technical part of podcasting), (e) creating voice from text-to-voice software, (f) creating audiobooks, and (g) suggested next steps in the podcasting process. I shared this talk for the United Kingdom Academic Peer Learning Community with a focus on podcasting. I have been podcasting since 2005 as a companion to my global history course and also with other topics of my interest. It was a fast-moving talk and demonstration.
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    Leader Identity Emergence of Study Group Facilitators
    (Journal of Peer Learning, 2022) Arendale, David R
    This qualitative study at the University of Minnesota–Twin Cities, USA, investigated leader identity emergence of study group facilitators. There is a gap in the professional literature regarding study group programs and identity emergence of the student paraprofessionals who facilitate the study sessions. This study built upon previous studies of identity formation by integrating educational theories that help explain the changes that occurred. Peer study group programs are powerful co-curricular experiences. This study provided answers to why and how identity emergence occurs. The Leader Identity Development Model for peer study group facilitators was developed based on the findings from this study and other experiences with study group leaders over the past three decades by David Arendale to help predict this change and the experiences that supported identity formation. Among those catalysts were written reflections by the study group leaders throughout the academic term on what they learned about themselves and about their conversations with other study leaders and the study group program manager. Implications are provided that explain how peer programs can become a more transformative learning ecosystem. Peer learning programs present an untapped personal and professional development opportunity for student leaders that would be even more powerful if it were intentional rather than serendipitous.
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    Public Service and Community Engagement Statement: David Arendale
    (2022-07-01) Arendale, David R
    Engaged service to the community is an integral part of my research, personal faith, and an extension of who I am as a connected member of society. Many of my service activities are directed related to increasing access and success of students in postsecondary education, especially those that are historically underrepresented. Part of my passion for serving students who are the first student in their families to attend college is that I am a first-generation college attendee and graduate. My parents were warmly supportive of my attending college. They did not have the financial resources to pay my board and tuition. Also, they could not provide mentoring for the rigors of college as neither of them had graduated from high school. As with many young people during the Great Depression, the model was to attend high school until 16, get a job, and then get married. I could not have asked for a better pair of parents who cultivated a love of learning and reading. Just as with my classroom experiences, community engagement is a critical grounding element of my research. It also becomes a venue to disseminate my research findings.
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    Research and Knowledge Dissemination Statement: David Arendale
    (2022-07-01) Arendale, David R
    My research explores academic access in postsecondary education and develops evidence-based strategies to increase the success of underrepresented student populations in college. I focus on filling the gap between scholarship that analyzes academic performance problems and proposed solutions to increase student outcomes. Access programs often operate at the confluence of academic affairs, student affairs, and enrollment management. This busy intersection of interests and needs has generated considerable turbulence for these programs. My multidisciplinary academic preparation and work experiences in academic affairs, student affairs, and enrollment management afford me unique tools for this investigation.
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    Teaching Statement: David Arendale
    (2022-07-01) Arendale, David R
    Most formal teaching statements contain the pedagogy employed, learning objectives, details of individual classes taught, evaluations of teaching, and more. I prepared one of those statements for my promotion to associate professor. Rather than updating that document, I am using instead a blog posting that I created for my retirement. It is more of a reflection than a statement. In any case, you will get to know me better with this document. The rest of this document is the original blog posting from May 2019.
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    Personal Faith Statement: David Arendale
    (2022-07-01) Arendale, David R
    College faculty members are often called upon to work in three environments at the same time: , , and . This is especially true for faculty who work at four-year research universities. These three environments often intersect with one another and are catalysts for actions. They help explain who I am as a professional educator. However, they leave out the personal dimension that fuels my interests expressed in those three areas. That is the reason I added the fourth statement. My faith in Jesus Christ is a powerful influence on my personal and professional life. In this faith statement, I share how my faith influenced my professional life in general and in particular the areas of teaching, research, and service. This statement has been long overdue for posting to my website.
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    History of Supplemental Instruction: The First 25 Years
    (2022) Arendale, David R
    This article describes the origins of the Supplemental Instruction Program which started in 1973 at a single college and has spread to more than 1,500 colleges in 35 countries. The paper shares the practical and conceptual reasons for the program creation. It also shares my role with the SI model in the early years.
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    2021 Postsecondary Peer Cooperative Learning Programs: Annotated Bibliography
    (2021-01-31) Arendale, David R
    This annotated bibliography does not attempt to be inclusive of this broad field of literature concerning peer collaborative learning. Instead, it is focused intentionally on a subset of the educational practice that shares a common focus with increasing student persistence towards graduation. At the end of this overview, several suggestions are made for differentiating the models from each other and the level of institutional resources and resolve with implementing them. The seven student peer learning programs included in this bibliography meet the following characteristics: (a) implemented at the postsecondary or tertiary level; (b) clear set of systematic procedures for its implementation that could be replicated by another institution; (c) program evaluation studies have been conducted and are available for review; (d) intentionally embeds learning strategy practice along with review of the academic content material; (e) outcomes include increased content knowledge, higher final course grades, higher pass rates, and higher college persistence rates; and (f) the program has been replicated at another institution with similar positive student outcomes. From a review of the professional literature, six programs emerged: (a) Accelerated Learning Groups (ALGs), (b) Emerging Scholars Program (ESP), (c) Peer Assisted Learning (PAL), (d) Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL), (e) Structured Learning Assistance (SLA), (f) Supplemental Instruction-PASS (SI-PASS), and (g) Video-based Supplemental Instruction (VSI). As will be described in the following narrative, some of the programs share common history and seek to improve upon previous practices. Other programs were developed independently.