Data Repository for U of M (DRUM) is a publicly available collection of digital research data generated by U of M researchers, students, and staff. Anyone can search and download the data housed in the repository, instantly or by request.

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Data Repository for U of M (DRUM)

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Now showing 1 - 20 of 987
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    Preparation and characterization of H-shaped polylactide
    Zografos, Aristotelis; Maines, Erin, M; Hassler, Joseph, F; Bates, Frank, S; Hillmyer, Marc, A; hillmyer@umn.edu; Hillmyer, Marc, A; University of Minnesota Department of Chemistry
    These files contain primary data along with associated output from instrumentation supporting all results reported in Zografos et al. Preparation and Characterization of H-Shaped Polylactide. In Zografos et al. we developed an efficient strategy for synthesizing H-polymers. An H-polymer has an architecture that consists of four branches symmetrically attached to the ends of a polymer backbone, similar in shape to the letter ‘H’. Here, a renewable H-polymer efficiently synthesized using only ring-opening transesterification is demonstrated for the first time. The strategy relies on a tetrafunctional poly(±-lactide) macroinitiator, from which four poly(±-lactide) branches are grown simultaneously. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography (SEC), and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrometry were used to verify the macroinitiator purity. Branch growth was probed using 1H-NMR spectroscopy and SEC to reveal unique transesterification phenomena that can be controlled to yield architecturally pure or more complex materials. H-shaped PLA was prepared at the grams scale with a weight average molar mass Mw > 100 kg/mol and narrow dispersity Ð < 1.15. Purification involved routine precipitations steps, which yielded products that were architecturally relatively pure (~93%). Small-amplitude oscillatory shear and extensional rheology measurements were used to demonstrate the unique viscoelastic behavior associated with the H-shaped architecture.
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    The FSRS data of crystalline halogen-substituted rubrene derivatives under different excitation conditions taken in the Frontiera lab at the University of Minnesota in 2022
    Clapham, Margaret L; Das, Aritra; Douglas, Christopher J; Frontiera, Renee R; rrf@umn.edu; Frontiera, Renee R; University of Minnesota Frontiera Lab
    These are the FSRS data files of crystalline halogen-substituted rubrene derivatives under different excitation conditions, taken in the Frontiera lab at the University of Minnesota in 2022. This data is released to support a publication submitted to the Journal of the American Chemical Society entitled "Killer Phonon Caught: Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy Identifies Phonon-Induced Control of Photophysics in Rubrene Derivatives".
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    Genomes to Fields Initiative Flight Data - Texas 2020
    Sweet, Dorothy D; Hirsch, Cory D; Hirsch, Candice N; Murray, Seth; cnhirsch@umn.edu; Hirsch, Candice N; Candice Hirsch Lab; Cory Hirsch Lab
    This dataset (DRUM 8 of 8) is a subset of the flight data collected through the Genomes to Fields Initiative in 2020 and 2021. In conjunction with equivalent datasets on similar material at alternate locations, this data provides a valuable resource for evaluating the performance and stability of hybrid maize across many environments. Many flights throughout the growing season were conducted at these locations (Delaware, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Texas) and this dataset includes the orthomosaics, DEMs, plot shapefiles, and extracted plant height values for each of those flights following the pipeline from Anderson, Steven L., II, Seth C. Murray, Lonesome Malambo, Colby Ratcliff, Sorin Popescu, Dale Cope, Anjin Chang, Jinha Jung, and J. Alex Thomasson. 2019. “Prediction of Maize Grain Yield before Maturity Using Improved Temporal Height Estimates of Unmanned Aerial Systems.” The Plant Phenome Journal 2 (1): 1–15.. This maize experiment consisted of over 1000 maize hybrids grown in partial replication across 8 environments in 2 years. A set of common hybrids were grown in every location in order to establish a connection between environments, Within the partially replicated set, hybrids were produced by the cross of double haploids derived from the WI-SS-MAGIC population to the inbred testers PHK76, PHP02, and PHZ51 with the tester choice depending on the relative maturity zone of the location. For this location (Texas 2020) PHZ51 was used. A modified randomized complete block design was used for testing.
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    Genomes to Fields Initiative Flight Data - Nebraska 2021
    Sweet, Dorothy D; Hirsch, Candice N; Hirsch, Cory D; Schnable, James; cnhirsch@umn.edu; Hirsch, Candice N; Candice Hirsch Lab; Cory Hirsch Lab
    This dataset (DRUM 7 of 8) is a subset of the flight data collected through the Genomes to Fields Initiative in 2020 and 2021. In conjunction with equivalent datasets on similar material at alternate locations, this data provides a valuable resource for evaluating the performance and stability of hybrid maize across many environments. Many flights throughout the growing season were conducted at these locations (Delaware, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Texas) and this dataset includes the orthomosaics, DEMs, plot shapefiles, and extracted plant height values for each of those flights following the pipeline from Anderson, Steven L., II, Seth C. Murray, Lonesome Malambo, Colby Ratcliff, Sorin Popescu, Dale Cope, Anjin Chang, Jinha Jung, and J. Alex Thomasson. 2019. “Prediction of Maize Grain Yield before Maturity Using Improved Temporal Height Estimates of Unmanned Aerial Systems.” The Plant Phenome Journal 2 (1): 1–15.. This maize experiment consisted of over 1000 maize hybrids grown in partial replication across 8 environments in 2 years. A set of common hybrids were grown in every location in order to establish a connection between environments, Within the partially replicated set, hybrids were produced by the cross of double haploids derived from the WI-SS-MAGIC population to the inbred testers PHK76, PHP02, and PHZ51 with the tester choice depending on the relative maturity zone of the location. For this location (Nebraska 2021) PHZ51 was used. A modified randomized complete block design was used for testing.
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    Genomes to Fields Initiative Flight Data - Missouri C5B 2020 - Part 2
    Sweet, Dorothy D; Hirsch, Cory D; Hirsch, Candice N; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Washburn, Jacob; cnhirsch@umn.edu; Hirsch, Candice N; Candice Hirsch Lab; Cory Hirsch Lab
    This dataset (DRUM 6 of 8) is a subset of the flight data collected through the Genomes to Fields Initiative in 2020 and 2021. In conjunction with equivalent datasets on similar material at alternate locations, this data provides a valuable resource for evaluating the performance and stability of hybrid maize across many environments. Many flights throughout the growing season were conducted at these locations (Delaware, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Texas) and this dataset includes the orthomosaics, DEMs, plot shapefiles, and extracted plant height values for each of those flights following the pipeline from Anderson, Steven L., II, Seth C. Murray, Lonesome Malambo, Colby Ratcliff, Sorin Popescu, Dale Cope, Anjin Chang, Jinha Jung, and J. Alex Thomasson. 2019. “Prediction of Maize Grain Yield before Maturity Using Improved Temporal Height Estimates of Unmanned Aerial Systems.” The Plant Phenome Journal 2 (1): 1–15.. This maize experiment consisted of over 1000 maize hybrids grown in partial replication across 8 environments in 2 years. A set of common hybrids were grown in every location in order to establish a connection between environments, Within the partially replicated set, hybrids were produced by the cross of double haploids derived from the WI-SS-MAGIC population to the inbred testers PHK76, PHP02, and PHZ51 with the tester choice depending on the relative maturity zone of the location. For this location (Missouri 2020) all testers were used. A modified randomized complete block design was used for testing.
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    Genomes to Fields Initiative Flight Data - Missouri C5B 2020 - Part 1
    Sweet, Dorothy D; Hirsch, Candice N; Hirsch, Cory D; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Washburn, Jacob; cnhirsch@umn.edu; Hirsch, Candice N; Candice Hirsch Lab; Cory Hirsch Lab
    This dataset (DRUM 5 of 8) is a subset of the flight data collected through the Genomes to Fields Initiative in 2020 and 2021. In conjunction with equivalent datasets on similar material at alternate locations, this data provides a valuable resource for evaluating the performance and stability of hybrid maize across many environments. Many flights throughout the growing season were conducted at these locations (Delaware, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Texas) and this dataset includes the orthomosaics, DEMs, plot shapefiles, and extracted plant height values for each of those flights following the pipeline from Anderson, Steven L., II, Seth C. Murray, Lonesome Malambo, Colby Ratcliff, Sorin Popescu, Dale Cope, Anjin Chang, Jinha Jung, and J. Alex Thomasson. 2019. “Prediction of Maize Grain Yield before Maturity Using Improved Temporal Height Estimates of Unmanned Aerial Systems.” The Plant Phenome Journal 2 (1): 1–15.. This maize experiment consisted of over 1000 maize hybrids grown in partial replication across 8 environments in 2 years. A set of common hybrids were grown in every location in order to establish a connection between environments, Within the partially replicated set, hybrids were produced by the cross of double haploids derived from the WI-SS-MAGIC population to the inbred testers PHK76, PHP02, and PHZ51 with the tester choice depending on the relative maturity zone of the location. For this location (Missouri 2020) all testers were used. A modified randomized complete block design was used for testing.
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    Genomes to Fields Initiative Flight Data - Missouri C5A 2020
    Sweet, Dorothy D; Hirsch, Cory D; Hirsch, Candice N; cnhirsch@umn.edu; Hirsch, Candice N; Candice Hirsch Lab; Cory Hirsch Lab
    This dataset (DRUM 4 of 8) is a subset of the flight data collected through the Genomes to Fields Initiative in 2020 and 2021. In conjunction with equivalent datasets on similar material at alternate locations, this data provides a valuable resource for evaluating the performance and stability of hybrid maize across many environments. Many flights throughout the growing season were conducted at these locations (Delaware, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Texas) and this dataset includes the orthomosaics, DEMs, plot shapefiles, and extracted plant height values for each of those flights following the pipeline from Anderson, Steven L., II, Seth C. Murray, Lonesome Malambo, Colby Ratcliff, Sorin Popescu, Dale Cope, Anjin Chang, Jinha Jung, and J. Alex Thomasson. 2019. “Prediction of Maize Grain Yield before Maturity Using Improved Temporal Height Estimates of Unmanned Aerial Systems.” The Plant Phenome Journal 2 (1): 1–15.. This maize experiment consisted of over 1000 maize hybrids grown in partial replication across 8 environments in 2 years. A set of common hybrids were grown in every location in order to establish a connection between environments, Within the partially replicated set, hybrids were produced by the cross of double haploids derived from the WI-SS-MAGIC population to the inbred testers PHK76, PHP02, and PHZ51 with the tester choice depending on the relative maturity zone of the location. For this location (Missouri 2020) all testers were used. A modified randomized complete block design was used for testing.
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    Genomes to Fields Initiative Flight Data - Minnesota 2021
    Sweet, Dorothy D; Hirsch, Candice N; Hirsch, Cory D; cnhirsch@umn.edu; Hirsch, Candice N; Candice Hirsch Lab; Cory Hirsch Lab
    This dataset (DRUM 3 of 8) is a subset of the flight data collected through the Genomes to Fields Initiative in 2020 and 2021. In conjunction with equivalent datasets on similar material at alternate locations, this data provides a valuable resource for evaluating the performance and stability of hybrid maize across many environments. Many flights throughout the growing season were conducted at these locations (Delaware, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Texas) and this dataset includes the orthomosaics, DEMs, plot shapefiles, and extracted plant height values for each of those flights following the pipeline from Anderson, Steven L., II, Seth C. Murray, Lonesome Malambo, Colby Ratcliff, Sorin Popescu, Dale Cope, Anjin Chang, Jinha Jung, and J. Alex Thomasson. 2019. “Prediction of Maize Grain Yield before Maturity Using Improved Temporal Height Estimates of Unmanned Aerial Systems.” The Plant Phenome Journal 2 (1): 1–15.. This maize experiment consisted of over 1000 maize hybrids grown in partial replication across 8 environments in 2 years. A set of common hybrids were grown in every location in order to establish a connection between environments, Within the partially replicated set, hybrids were produced by the cross of double haploids derived from the WI-SS-MAGIC population to the inbred testers PHK76, PHP02, and PHZ51 with the tester choice depending on the relative maturity zone of the location. For this location (Minnesota 2021) PHP02 was used. A modified randomized complete block design was used for testing.
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    Genomes to Fields Initiative Flight Data - Minnesota 2020
    Sweet, Dorothy D; Hirsch, Candice N; Hirsch, Candice C; cnhirsch@umn.edu; Hirsch, Candice N; University of Minnesota Hirsch Lab; Candice Hirsch Lab; Cory Hirsch Lab
    This dataset (DRUM 2 of 8) is a subset of the flight data collected through the Genomes to Fields Initiative in 2020 and 2021. In conjunction with equivalent datasets on similar material at alternate locations, this data provides a valuable resource for evaluating the performance and stability of hybrid maize across many environments. Many flights throughout the growing season were conducted at these locations (Delaware, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Texas) and this dataset includes the orthomosaics, DEMs, plot shapefiles, and extracted plant height values for each of those flights following the pipeline from Anderson, Steven L., II, Seth C. Murray, Lonesome Malambo, Colby Ratcliff, Sorin Popescu, Dale Cope, Anjin Chang, Jinha Jung, and J. Alex Thomasson. 2019. “Prediction of Maize Grain Yield before Maturity Using Improved Temporal Height Estimates of Unmanned Aerial Systems.” The Plant Phenome Journal 2 (1): 1–15.. This maize experiment consisted of over 1000 maize hybrids grown in partial replication across 8 environments in 2 years. A set of common hybrids were grown in every location in order to establish a connection between environments, Within the partially replicated set, hybrids were produced by the cross of double haploids derived from the WI-SS-MAGIC population to the inbred testers PHK76, PHP02, and PHZ51 with the tester choice depending on the relative maturity zone of the location. For this location (Minnesota 2020) PHP02 was used. A modified randomized complete block design was used for testing.
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    Genomes to Fields Initiative Flight Data - Delaware 2020
    Sweet, Dorothy D; Hirsch, Candice N; Hirsch, Cory D; Sparks, Erin E; Miller, Jarrod O; cnhirsch@umn.edu; Hirsch, Candice N; Candice Hirsch Lab; Cory Hirsch Lab
    This dataset (DRUM 1 of 8) is a subset of the flight data collected through the Genomes to Fields Initiative in 2020 and 2021. In conjunction with equivalent datasets on similar material at alternate locations, this data provides a valuable resource for evaluating the performance and stability of hybrid maize across many environments. Many flights throughout the growing season were conducted at these locations (Delaware, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Texas) and this dataset includes the orthomosaics, DEMs, plot shapefiles, and extracted plant height values for each of those flights following the pipeline from Anderson, Steven L., II, Seth C. Murray, Lonesome Malambo, Colby Ratcliff, Sorin Popescu, Dale Cope, Anjin Chang, Jinha Jung, and J. Alex Thomasson. 2019. “Prediction of Maize Grain Yield before Maturity Using Improved Temporal Height Estimates of Unmanned Aerial Systems.” The Plant Phenome Journal 2 (1): 1–15.. This maize experiment consisted of over 1000 maize hybrids grown in partial replication across 8 environments in 2 years. A set of common hybrids were grown in every location in order to establish a connection between environments, Within the partially replicated set, hybrids were produced by the cross of double haploids derived from the WI-SS-MAGIC population to the inbred testers PHK76, PHP02, and PHZ51 with the tester choice depending on the relative maturity zone of the location. For this location (Delaware 2020) all testers were used. A modified randomized complete block design was used for testing.
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    Evidence for superoxide-initiated oxidation of aniline in water by pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma
    Clay, Collin D.; Mueller, Chelsea M.; Rich, Christopher; Schatz, George C.; Bruggeman, Peter; rrf@umn.edu; Frontiera, Renee R.
    Plasma-driven solution electrochemistry (PDSE) uses plasma-generated reactive species to drive redox reactions in solution. Non-thermal, atmospheric pressure plasmas, when irradiating water, produce many redox species. While PDSE is a promising chemical tool, there is limited insight into the mechanisms of the reactions due to the variety of short-lived reagents produced. In this study, we use aniline as a model system for studying redox mechanisms of PDSE. We show that the plasma irradiation of aqueous aniline solutions drives the formation of polyaniline oligomer, which is suppressed under acidic starting conditions. The addition of (2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO), a radical scavenger, decreases the formation of oligomer by 80%, and the addition of superoxide dismutase fully hinders oligomerization. These results lead us to conclude that the oligomerization of aniline by plasma irradiation is initiated by superoxide. This discovery provides novel insights into PDSE mechanisms and illustrates a potential method of harnessing superoxide for chemical reactions.
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    Groundwater chemistry data, real-time temperature, elevation, and specific conductance for MN Wells 668848 and 668849 (May 2021 - May 2024)
    (2024-05-07T17:14:51Z) McDaris, John; Feinberg, Joshua; Wiest, Nicholas; mcda0030@umn.edu; McDaris, John; University of Minnesota Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences
    Full water chemistry analysis data from two wells (668848, 668849) adjacent to Williamson Hall on the East Bank Campus of the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Water samples were taken ~quarterly in conjunction with a PhD project led by McDaris. Feinberg and Wiest assisted in sample collection and interpretation. The wells were also instrumented with in situ sensors measuring groundwater temperature, elevation, and specific conductance. Measurements from these sensors were taken multiple times per hour for three years.
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    Sediment mixing and dissolved oxygen and nutrient dynamics in a six week microcosm experiment containing Great Lakes macroinvertebrates
    (2024-05-06T19:45:47Z) Huff, Audrey H; Rigdon, Matt; Zalusky, John; Katsev, Sergei; Ozersky, Ted; huff0114@umn.edu; Huff, Audrey E; University of Minnesota Duluth Large Lakes Observatory
    Physical and geochemical dynamics at the sediment-water interface in a six-week microcosm experiment including Great Lakes macroinvertebrates (dreissenids, Diporeia, and oligochaete worms) with varying functional biology. Microcosms included single and multi-taxon treatments and data includes sediment mixing rate (as luminophore profiles), weekly NO2,3 and NH3 fluxes between the sediment and overlying water, weekly sediment dissolved oxygen microprofiles, and pore water NO2,3, NH3, and P profiles.
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    Heimpel et al. BRI model in Excel and R code
    (2024-05-06T14:03:49Z) Heimpel, George E; Abram, Paul K; Causton, Charlotte E; Celis, Sabrina L; Coll, Moshe; Hardy, Ian CW; Mangel, Marc; Mills, Nicholas J; Segoli, Michal; heimp001@umn.edu; Heimpel, George E; University of Minnesota Heimpel Laboratory
    The release of biological control agents has been an important means of controlling invasive species for over 150 years. While these releases have led to the sustainable control of over 250 invasive pest and weed species worldwide, a minority have caused environmental harm. A growing recognition of the risks of biological control led to a focus on risk assessment beginning in the 1990s along with a precipitous decline in releases. While this new focus greatly improved the safety of biological control, it came at the cost of lost opportunities to solve environmental problems associated with invasive species. A framework that incorporates benefits and risks of biological control is thus needed to understand the net environmental effects of biological control releases. We introduce such a framework, using native biodiversity as the common currency for both benefits and risks. The model is based on interactions among four categories of organisms: (i) the biological control agent, (ii) the invasive species (pest or weed) targeted by the agent, (iii) one or more native species that stand to benefit from the control of the target species, and (iv) one or more native species that are at risk of being harmed by the released biological control agent. Conservation values of the potentially benefited and harmed native species are incorporated as well, and they are weighted according to three axes: vulnerability to extinction, the ecosystem services provided, and cultural significance. Further, we incorporate the potential for indirect risks to native species, which we consider will result mainly from the ecological process of agent enrichment that may occur if the agent exploits but does not control the target pest or weed. We illustrate the use of this framework by retrospectively analyzing the release of the vedalia beetle, Novius (= Rodolia) cardinalis, to control the cottony cushion scale, Icerya purchasi, in the Galapagos Islands. While the framework is particularly adaptable to biological control releases in natural areas, it can also be used in managed settings, where biological control protects native species through the reduction of pesticide use.
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    Data supporting "Perceptually salient differences in a species recognition cue do not promote auditory streaming in eastern gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor)"
    (2024-05-02T16:55:24Z) Kalra, Lata; Altman, Shoshana; Bee, Mark A; latakalra94@gmail.com; Kalra, Lata
    This dataset corresponds to behavioral choice tests performed on the females of Hyla versicolor to investigate if this species uses perceptually salient differences in species-recognition cue (pulse rise time) to segregate the signal of a potential mate from other overlapping sounds in the environment. Females in this species chose a potential mate based on the properties of the advertisement call. Advertisement calls having slow pulse rise times (time elapsed from the beginning of a pulse to the pulses's maximum amplitude) and slow pulse repetition rate (around 20 pulses/s) are behaviorally attractive to the females. In contrast, calls having fast rise times and fast pulse rates (~40-50 pulses/s) are unattractive. Here, we exploited the subjects' inherent attractiveness for slow rise times and slow pulse rates to design interleaved pulsatile sequences ABAB (repeating at an unattractive pulse rate of 40 pulses/s) having behaviorally attractive slow (pulses 'A'), and behaviorally unattractive fast (pulses 'B') rise-times. We hypothesized that if the rise-times differences between pulses 'A' and 'B' are perceptually salient then the subjects should segregate ABAB into two sequences (A-A- and B-B-, each at an attractive rate of 20 pulses/s each). We first tested (using a two-alternative choice test; Test C3) if the differences between the two rise times were perceptually salient (subjects got a choice between A-A- and B-B-). We then gave the subjects a segregation task (using a four-alternative choice test; Test T1) wherein they got a choice between four alternatives, three of which were designed to be unattractive (AAAA, BBBB and AABB). The fourth alternative ABAB was attractive only if the subjects could segregate A-A- and B-B-, so as to perceive the "attractive" slow pulse rise time at an "attractive" rate of 20 pulses/s. We did an additional test (using a four-alternative choice test; Test C1) to confirm that subjects prefer slow pulse rise times, slow pulse rates and regular pulse-timing patterns within the calls (a four-alternative choice between AAAA, BBBB, AA-- and A-A-). For each test, we recorded if the subject responded by making a choice ('yes' or 'no'), if it responded, which alternative did it chose, and how long did it take to make the choice (choice latency). We also recorded a subject's id, the temperature at which the behavioral test was performed, and the Sound Pressure Level (SPL) of the broadcast stimuli.
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    Data for Multiparametric Identification of Putative Senescent Cells in Skeletal Muscle via Mass Cytometry
    (2024-05-02T14:19:27Z) Baig, Nameera; Li, Yijia; Roncancio, Daniel; Elbein, Kris; Lowe, Dawn; Kyba, Michael; Arriaga, Edgar A; arriaga@umn.edu; Arriaga, Edgar A; University of Minnesota, Arriaga Lab
    This study includes three sets of compressed files: the original data (35 FCS documents collected from the CyTOF2 instrument per mouse), the gating results (FCS files gated based on the diagram in Figure S1 of the article 'Multiparametric Identification of Putative Senescent Cells in Skeletal Muscle via Mass Cytometry', with 35 per mouse for each cell type) and the batch corrected gating results (CSV files for each cell type). Also included is an ipynb file for a Jupyter notebook used for data analysis. This notebook reproduces the analysis pipeline and generates some plots used in the manuscript. The batch corrected gating results serve as the input for this analysis.
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    Genotype and population data for "Isolation-by-environment and its consequences for range shifts with global change: landscape genomics of the invasive plant common tansy"
    (2024-04-29T18:28:33Z) Briscoe Runquist, Ryan; rbriscoe@umn.edu; Briscoe Runquist, Ryan
    Invasive species are a growing global economic and ecological problem. However, it is not well understood how environmental factors mediate invasive range expansion. In this study, we investigated the recent and rapid range expansion of common tansy across environmental gradients in Minnesota, U.S.A. We densely sampled individuals across the expanding range and performed reduced representation sequencing to generate a dataset of 3071 polymorphic loci for 176 individuals. We used non-spatial and spatially-explicit analyses to determine the relative influences of geographic distance and environmental variation on patterns of genomic variation. We found no evidence for isolation-by-distance (IBD) but strong evidence for isolation-by-environment (IBE).
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    3D Maps
    (2024-04-29T14:51:19Z) Campbell, Karen; Morin, Paul; kmc@umn.edu; Campbell, Karen; National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics 2
    NCED is currently involved in researching the effectiveness of anaglyph maps in the classroom and are working with educators and scientists to interpret various Earth-surface processes. Based on the findings of the research, various activities and interpretive information will be developed and available for educators to use in their classrooms. Keep checking back with this website because activities and maps are always being updated. We believe that anaglyph maps are an important tool in helping students see the world and are working to further develop materials and activities to support educators in their use of the maps. This website has various 3-D maps and supporting materials that are available for download. Maps can be printed, viewed on computer monitors, or projected on to screens for larger audiences. Keep an eye on our website for more maps, activities and new information. Let us know how you use anaglyph maps in your classroom. Email any ideas or activities you have to ncedmaps@umn.edu Anaglyph paper maps are a cost effective offshoot of the GeoWall Project. Geowall is a high end visualization tool developed for use in the University of Minnesota's Geology and Geophysics Department. Because of its effectiveness it has been expanded to 300 institutions across the United States. GeoWall projects 3-D images and allows students to see 3-D representations but is limited because of the technology. Paper maps are a cost effective solution that allows anaglyph technology to be used in classroom and field-based applications. Maps are best when viewed with RED/CYAN anaglyph glasses! A note on downloading: "viewable" maps are .jpg files; "high-quality downloads" are .tif files. While it is possible to view the latter in a web-browser in most cases, the download may be slow. As an alternative, try right-clicking on the link to the high-quality download and choosing "save" from the pop-up menu that results. Save the file to your own machine, then try opening the saved copy. This may be faster than clicking directly on the link to open it in the browser.
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    Raw Data for Bighead Carp, Common Carp and Largemouth Bass Light Avoidance Studies in a Laboratory Flume (2018-2019)
    (2024-04-25T16:11:29Z) Dennis III, Clark E; Sorensen, Peter W; cdennis2@illinois.edu; Dennis, Clark; Sorensen Laboratory
    Raw data of fish passage rates and light measurements from high-intensity light avoidance tests of bighead carp, common carp and largemouth bass in a laboratory flume. This data is made available to support a open access publication submitted to Management of Biological Invasions entitled "High-intensity light blocks bighead carp passage in a laboratory flume",
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    Cardea SOLO and Televet measurements on 12 horses
    (2024-04-25T15:52:59Z) Durward-Akhurst, Sian A; Hauser, Robert G; Dias, Tatiana D; McCue, Molly E; durwa004@umn.edu; Durward-Akhurst, Sian A; University of Minnesota Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences
    The Cardea SOLOTM (CS) is a single-use monitor with automated ECG analysis software allowing for ECG monitoring for approximately 7 days. ECGs were performed on 12 healthy horses simultaneously using both devices for 24 hours on day 1 and day 7, with the CS left in place for all seven days. Bland-Altman analysis and intraclass correlation were performed to test for agreement between the two devices for standard ECG measurements performed on both ECG traces.