Emotion Regulation and Socialization in the Context of Cumulative Risk: Social-Emotional Adjustment in Children Experiencing Homelessness

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Persistent link to this item

Statistics
View Statistics

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Title

Emotion Regulation and Socialization in the Context of Cumulative Risk: Social-Emotional Adjustment in Children Experiencing Homelessness

Published Date

2018-08

Publisher

Type

Thesis or Dissertation

Abstract

The acquisition of emotion regulation skills is a key developmental task, largely socialized by caregivers, that lays the foundation for healthy social-emotional adjustment. Unfortunately, both parental socialization and children’s self-regulation are disrupted in contexts of high cumulative risk. The current dissertation evaluated emotion regulation and socialization during observed parent-child interaction as predictors of social-emotional adjustment in young children experiencing homelessness. Study 1 used linear regression and latent profile analysis to identify links among child reactivity and regulation, parental affect profiles, and teacher-reported adjustment in the context of risk and adversity. Children’s difficulty down-regulating anger during parent-child interaction was linked to more teacher-reported social-behavioral problems. Empirically-derived profiles of parent affect were related to child behavior during the interaction and in the classroom: the minority of parents showing elevated anger had children who were observed to struggle with anger down-regulation and were reported by teachers to have more social-behavioral problems at school. Sociodemographic risk additionally predicted more social-behavioral problems, controlling for child and parent anger expression. Study 2 built on these findings using dynamic structural equation modeling to investigate dyadic interplay between parent and child anger across the problem-solving discussion. Parents and children showed significant stability in anger from one interval to the next, as well as cross-lagged associations consistent with bidirectional feedback processes and significant novel anger reactivity. Individual differences in child anger stability were related to more social-behavioral problems at school. More observed anger contagion, particularly from child to parent, predicted more parent-reported externalizing problems, as did higher family adversity. Results are interpreted in light of theory and research and future directions are discussed.

Description

University of Minnesota Ph.D. dissertation.August 2018. Major: Child Psychology. Advisor: Ann Masten. 1 computer file (PDF); vi, 111 pages.

Related to

Replaces

License

Collections

Series/Report Number

Funding information

Isbn identifier

Doi identifier

Previously Published Citation

Suggested citation

Labella, Madelyn. (2018). Emotion Regulation and Socialization in the Context of Cumulative Risk: Social-Emotional Adjustment in Children Experiencing Homelessness. Retrieved from the University Digital Conservancy, https://hdl.handle.net/11299/201156.

Content distributed via the University Digital Conservancy may be subject to additional license and use restrictions applied by the depositor. By using these files, users agree to the Terms of Use. Materials in the UDC may contain content that is disturbing and/or harmful. For more information, please see our statement on harmful content in digital repositories.