Near Future Cities in Film: The Dystopic Erosion of Globalization's Rising Tides

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Near Future Cities in Film: The Dystopic Erosion of Globalization's Rising Tides

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2012-09-14

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Film, as a popular culture artifact, serves both as a medium for social reflection and a mechanism for provoking and predicting future changes in our increasingly interconnected global culture. In terms of cities and their social, political, and physical characteristics, cities in film serve as a means of commentary, expression, and a vehicle of experimentation with regard to possible future developments. This research project explores the topic of how near future First-World cities are projected in film with an emphasis on the consequences of globalization for future urban populations. By employing social entropy theory, the dystopian imagery and narratives of selected films are used to explain and contextualize the potential erosion of boundaries in near future cities brought about under the pressures of globalization.

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University of Minnesota master's thesis. Summer 2012. Degree: Master of Liberal Studies. Advisor: John Tomsyck. 1 digital file (pdf)

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McGarry, Robert William IV. (2012). Near Future Cities in Film: The Dystopic Erosion of Globalization's Rising Tides. Retrieved from the University Digital Conservancy, https://hdl.handle.net/11299/133420.

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