Mitigating the Effects of Early Experience: Adolescent Social functioning as a predictor of adult health

Persistent link to this item

Statistics
View Statistics

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Title

Mitigating the Effects of Early Experience: Adolescent Social functioning as a predictor of adult health

Published Date

2014-06

Publisher

Type

Thesis or Dissertation

Abstract

Researchers examining the etiology of chronic illness in adulthood are increasingly looking back towards early life events to find risk factors for disease. To date, researchers have failed to account for the tremendous amount of social growth and development that takes place in the intervening years between infancy and adulthood. This prospective longitudinal study examines the influence of adolescent and young adult social functioning on adult physical outcomes above and beyond the influence of early life social functioning. This study also examines the relative influence of social functioning, socio-economic status (SES), and health history on adult health outcomes. Participants from this study are a subsample from the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (N=167) who have been followed from birth to age 34 years. Social functioning was assessed in infancy as the continuity of attachment classifications between ages 12 and 18 months. Adolescent, young adult, and adult social functioning were assessed via qualitative codes of videotaped interactions and interviews. At age 32 and 34 years participants were asked about the presence of or treatment for any physical illness. Results indicated that infant social functioning predicted the likelihood of reporting a physical illness in adulthood above and beyond the effects of later social functioning, early and concurrent SES, physical health, concurrent body mass index, gender, and self-reported neuroticism. These findings indicate that attachment in infancy exerts a powerful influence on later physical health outcomes and suggests that it as a powerful point of intervention.

Description

University of Minnesota Ph.D. dissertation. June 2014. Major: Child Psychology. Advisors: W. Andrew Collins Michelle M. Englund: 1 computer file (PDF); vi, 120 pages, appendices A-D.

Related to

Replaces

License

Collections

Series/Report Number

Funding information

Isbn identifier

Doi identifier

Previously Published Citation

Suggested citation

Puig, Jennifer. (2014). Mitigating the Effects of Early Experience: Adolescent Social functioning as a predictor of adult health. Retrieved from the University Digital Conservancy, https://hdl.handle.net/11299/165780.

Content distributed via the University Digital Conservancy may be subject to additional license and use restrictions applied by the depositor. By using these files, users agree to the Terms of Use. Materials in the UDC may contain content that is disturbing and/or harmful. For more information, please see our statement on harmful content in digital repositories.