Network Structure and Travel Time Perception

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Network Structure and Travel Time Perception

Published Date

2013

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PLoS One

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Article

Abstract

Road networks have an underlying structure. This structure is defined by the layout, arrangement and the connectivity of the individual network elements, the road segments and their intersections. The differences in network structure exist across and within networks. Travelers perceive and respond to these differences in underlying network structure and complexity. This paper extends the analysis to understanding the underlying theory of why network structure influences travel. Specifically the focus is on the influence of network structure on travel time perception. The hypothesis here is that network design influences traveler perceptions, more specifically the perceptions of travel distance and time. This perception of travel distance and time in turn influences the actual travel by affecting choice of destination, mode, route, and whether to engage in activities.

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http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077718

Previously Published Citation

Parthasarathi, Pavithra, David Levinson, and Hartwig Hochmair (2013) Network Structure and Travel Time Perception. PLoS One. 8(10) e77718.

Suggested citation

Parthasarathi, Pavithra. (2013). Network Structure and Travel Time Perception. Retrieved from the University Digital Conservancy, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077718.

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