Reclaiming languages, decolonizing knowledge(s): Articulating Indigenous knowledge(s) in and for language reclamation

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Reclaiming languages, decolonizing knowledge(s): Articulating Indigenous knowledge(s) in and for language reclamation

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2019

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Indigenous scholars have long been calling for the integration of Indigenous ways of teaching and learning in education (e.g. Kawagley, 2005; Simpson, 2002), showing that placing Indigenous philosophies at the center of curriculum makes education more relevant to students and helps ameliorate persistent educational inequalities (Brayboy et al., 2015; McCarty & Lee, 2015). Language is an active and living repository of Indigenous philosophies and world views, vital for maintaining Indigenous knowledge systems (McCarty & Lee, 2015). This research project seeks to learn from Indigenous language and culture reclamation efforts and initiatives that aim to center Indigeneity to reclaim what has been or could be lost. Through a review of community-based and community-driven Indigenous education programs in the U.S. and around the world, this research project explores the knowledges and pedagogies that drive these efforts, specifically, how Indigenous knowledge systems are being articulated within language reclamation movements. The knowledge gained through this investigation will help support the youth-led development of Bòg!, an interactive game that centers students’ home languages and knowledge systems through storytelling. The goal is to bring this work to schools and other organizations in Minnesota that work with linguistically diverse youth to reclaim their culture and native languages.

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