Transition to College Courses: General College Students' Perceptions of the Relationships between High School and College Courses

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Transition to College Courses: General College Students' Perceptions of the Relationships between High School and College Courses

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1996-10

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University of Minnesota: General College

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Report

Abstract

In the spring of 1995, 994 students enrolled in General College were asked to compare their GC courses to those taken in high school1. The questionnaire was prompted by an earlier study of GC students who had transferred to upper division colleges, some of whom reported that their beginning college courses could have been more challenging and were similar to courses they took in high school (Wambach & Woods, 1995). The purpose of this study was to see if the perception that some college courses are similar to courses offered in high school was: present in students who have recently completed those courses, related to the content of the courses or methods used to teach them, or related to the high schools the students attended. If the study revealed that the majority of GC students reported strong similarities between GC courses and high school courses, then the college would have to reconsider the appropriateness of the existing curriculum.

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Wambach, Catherine; Thatcher, Kerry; Woods, Marti. (1996). Transition to College Courses: General College Students' Perceptions of the Relationships between High School and College Courses. Retrieved from the University Digital Conservancy, https://hdl.handle.net/11299/45975.

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