Skip to main content
Analysis of Natural Antimicrobial Extracts of Rhus typhina Found in Minneapolis
Barbeau, Adam (2012)
 

Title 
Analysis of Natural Antimicrobial Extracts of Rhus typhina Found in Minneapolis

Author(s)

Issue Date
2012-04-18

Type
Presentation

Abstract
Plants produce numerous organic compounds that have antimicrobial activity. (Borchardt, 2008b; Gillitzer et al. in review) These natural products are found in tissues and structures throughout the plant, including the stems, berries, mature/young leaves, and roots. The many native and naturalized plant species that grow throughout Minnesota are a potential source of chemicals with antimicrobial properties that could be useful in medicines, cosmetics, preservatives or pesticides. Identification of antimicrobial compounds from a wide array of plant tissues and numerous plant species requires screening of numerous extracts from many different plant sources for their biological activity. Alamar Blue (AB), a nontoxic, water soluble dye, changes color from indigo blue to fluorescent pink in the presence of living cells. This color change is an accurate indicator of the fungistatic activity of plant extracts, via respiration, dissolved in a solution of water, nutrient broth, and AB. Phytopthora sojae is a soil borne plant pathogen and major cause of soybean crop loss. Zoospores are a motile reproductive stage of P. sojae critical to the infection process.

Appears in Collection(s)

Sponsorship
This research was supported by the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP).

Suggested Citation
Barbeau, Adam. (2012). Analysis of Natural Antimicrobial Extracts of Rhus typhina Found in Minneapolis. Retrieved from the University of Minnesota Digital Conservancy, http://purl.umn.edu/136054.


Content distributed via the University of Minnesota's Digital Conservancy may be subject to additional license and use restrictions applied by the depositor.